Ultra-secure perimeter fencing now being installed at new Constantia Nek Estate

Developers claim they are setting a higher benchmark in residential security.

Living up to the promise that they made at the launch of their 11ha Constantia Nek Estate in December last year, the developers Mark Cockburn and David Delbridge, are installing a security fencing configuration that ,they say, will set a new benchmark for this type of perimeter protection. The work is well under way, and together with the installation of all the services (including a fibre optic backbone) is on target for completion by early fourth quarter this year.

The fencing is in two parallel rows, both 2.6 metres high including the electrification. These enclose and are bounded on both sides by cleared “no-go” areas which will be monitored around the clock by 23 state- of-the- art Bosch Thermal Imaging wide lens cameras. These, says Cockburn, are backed up and supported by sophisticated hardware and software, which provides clear, detailed imagery in all weather conditions as well as throughout the night. They will be monitored by two security teams on and off-site, with armed response capability. The concept of parallel ‘off site’ monitoring by dedicated professionals is, he says, an important aspect of the whole security configuration.

“The imagery will be identified, analysed and reported on within a matter of seconds,” said Cockburn, adding that, “There is always a danger with hi-tech, modern equipment of this kind that it will be unsightly—but this perimeter fence is aesthetically appropriate to the site: Despite being very tough, it is slim, elegant and dark black in colour.”

The attractive entrance lodge and gate which will be sited close to the site’s lowest point on the Hout Bay—Constantia Nek road will also be guarded and monitored round the clock.

To date, only three months after the launch, over half of the 40 erven in the development have already been sold. Homeowners will build their homes in accordance with “extremely well considered” architectural guidelines, which are designed to ensure that all homes have a rural, recognizable Cape appearance and that their interiors link with the outdoors and the stunning views of the Oranjekloof nature reserve, in which only indigenous trees and shrubs are found.